Injecting Advice

Acidifiers Advice (Part 2)

Written by Nigel Brunsdon on . Posted in .

In the previous article I spoke about the differences between ‘bad’ acids like lemon juice and good commercially available acids. In this short article I’m going to explain the differences between the two main acids available in needle exchanges to people who inject, along with what advice we should be giving people who are using them.

Citric acid

Citric is by far the most commonly used commercial acid, some of this is because some exchanges only stock Citric and some is because to most injectors it’s just what they are used to using. As I’ve already discussed in the previous article , citric is sold in packets containing MORE than is needed for a £10 bag of heroin.

VitC

Citric vs VitCVitC is ascorbic acid, again like Citric it’s sold in packets that have plenty of acid in (both have about enough for 3 bags of heroin) but in the case of VitC the packs have more powder in because it’s weaker.

Weaker is better? Citric vs VitC

It may seem strange but for once weaker IS better. I’ve included a small image that I’d use with injectors, this shows that if you don’t included enough acid then you don’t cook down your gear, then you get a sweet spot where the solution is cooked down but the PH level is quite neutral, and finally you get to the stage where you have too much and the solution becomes an acid itself.

A solution that’s an acid will increase the chances of both vein damage and abscess. Because VitC is weaker the point where you hit the ‘sweet spot’ is far easier to reach without the solution going over into an acid.

For more information on VitC and Citric visit Exchange Supplies.
Read Acidifiers Advice (Part 1)

Writer: Nigel Brunsdon

Nigel Brunsdon is the owner of Injecting Advice. He’s been working in harm reduction since the 1990’s, previously a frontline needle programme worker he now splits his time between photography and developing online resources for drugs workers and users.

Nigel Brunsdon

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