Injecting Advice

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The United Kingdom’s first unsanctioned overdose prevention site; A proof-of-concept evaluation

Research based on the overdose prevention site which was opened by Peter Krykant in Glasgow in 2020. With no financial or other support from local or national governmental agencies, he acquired a second-hand minibus and equipped it with basic first-aid equipment, needles and sterile equipment, and naloxone. It opened on 31st August 2020 (International Overdose Awareness Day), parked at a single site in Glasgow city centre.

National Wound Care Guide (Scotland)

This resource aims to help people working within harm reduction and injection equipment provision (IEP) services, and anyone who works with people who inject drugs, to assess injection sites and identify potential complications arising from injecting street drugs.

Shooting Up: Infections among people who inject drugs in the UK

People who inject drugs (PWID) are vulnerable to a wide range of viral and bacterial infections. These infections can result in high levels of illness and in death, so public health surveillance of infectious diseases and the associated risk and protective behaviours among this group are important. This Public Health England publication reports on the extent of infections among people who inject drugs (PWID) in the UK.

Injecting Equipment Provision in Scotland

New good practice guidance on the provision of injecting equipment in Scotland has been published. This is the first such publication in Scotland since the 2010 Guidelines for services providing injecting equipment: Best practice recommendations for commissioners and injecting equipment provision services in Scotland.

Minimum Standards for Needle Exchanges and Harm Reduction Services

The charity Humankind has launched a new minimum standards document for their organisations harm reduction services. The new standards are intended to improve equitable access to needle and syringe provision and reduce the stigma and discrimination faced by people who use substances.

Low Dead Space Injecting Equipment: A Briefing

Maximising the Effectiveness of Needle Exchange with low dead space syringes and prevention of accidental sharing, this briefing by Exchange Supplies is a free 24 page book that is a comprehensive guide to addressing these two key areas of injecting related risk.

Low Dead Space Posters and Leaflet

Low dead space injecting equipment has less space between the needle and the plunger after injecting. Blood and drug remain in this space, so if equipment is shared the risk of spreading blood-borne viruses, such as HIV and hepatitis C, is higher when there’s more blood left in the equipment.

Chemsex and Harm Reduction for Gay Men Who Have Sex With Other Men

Chemsex briefing from Harm Reduction International. Using substances for sex and socialising is not a new phenomenon. Drug use was documented among gay men and other men who have sex with men long before the term “chemsex” was coined. Chemsex, which has come to the attention of public health professionals in the past decade, involves both sexual and drug-related high risk behaviours such as multiple sexual partners, the use of multiple drugs together, and injecting drug use.

HIV in the UK

Public Health England produce this annual report reviews data for 2019 on new HIV diagnoses, people accessing care in the United Kingdom (UK) and HIV testing in England. It is associated with a set of data tables and a slide set for presentations.

Global State of Harm Reduction Reports

Harm Reduction International’s flagship publication is the biennial Global State of Harm Reduction report. First published in 2008, it involves a coordinated effort across practitioners, academics, advocates and activists to map global data and responses to HIV and hepatitis C epidemics related to unsafe injecting and non-injecting drug use.
 
Useful Websites
  • National Needle Exchange Forum

    The National Needle Exchange Forum (NNEF) exists to actively promote and support the provision of high quality needle and syringe programmes, therefore ensuring the reduction of injecting-related harm as a key part of the English drugs strategy. The NNEF members are needle and syringe programme staff, users and advocates from across England.
  • Naloxone.org.uk

    This website aims to be a hub for information, guidance, news and research on Take Home Naloxone (THN). The main focus is on THN in the UK, although they have included select pieces of information on the supply of naloxone internationally.
  • HIT

    HIT delivers effective interventions on drugs, community safety and other public health concerns. They produce publications, run mass media campaigns, deliver training, organise conferences and provide consultancy to individuals, community groups, health and social care and criminal justice agencies locally, nationally and at an international level.

    Images and content © Nigel Brunsdon unless stated otherwise, all rights reserved.

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